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TOPIC: IRiS_the_Tax_Dog,_biting_at_the_buttocks_of_those_running_away
Created by: vabeachcouple33
Original Starting post for this thread:
Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin renounced his US citizenship in 2011 and now lives in Singapore. He made this move shortly before Facebook announced its IPO intentions, on which Saverin stands to make around $4 billion in capital gains (the capital gains tax rate in Singapore is 0%).

Sens. Schumer and Bob Casey, D-Pa., will unveil the “Ex-PATRIOT Act” – “Expatriation Prevention by Abolishing Tax-Related Incentives for Offshore Tenancy”.

The senators call Saverin’s move an “outrage” and will outline their plan to re-impose taxes on expatriates like Saverin even after they flee the United States and take up residence in a foreign country. Their proposal would also impose a mandatory 30 percent tax on the capital gains of anybody who renounces their U.S. citizenship.

The plan would bar individuals like Saverin from ever reentering the United States again. ----------------- *cough cough*

Anyone want to ask me again why I continue to plod along in Green Card mode?

Rather than ask why some of the wealthy flee the country with their wealth, the focus is on how to obstruct them from doing so.

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Not quite that easy.

Say we could decide on a number.

I would think that number means something different than you think it means.

There is no reality. Only perception. We think objects are solid. If we were smaller, a smooth tabletop might seem like a mountain range.

Fullerton CA
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Here's a new mental noodling...

I've said previously, that I came from a lower-ish middle-class background. My father was a cop, my mother a stay-at-home Mom until I was a teenager, and then a city clerk. We lived in a 1,200 sq ft 3-bedroom house they could barely afford. "Dinner out" was maybe twice a month, usually McDonalds. We weren't poor, exactly, but my parents had to stretch out everything, and sometimes dinner was something stupid like "leftover pancakes". By the time I was a late teenager they were doing better, but then I began my own family, and was poverty line again with Mrs. VA until I graduated from grad school (with no small amount of student loan debt) at the age of 29. Look up "Vanier" on urbandictionary. Lovely people there. "Couldn't have been a day over 15. Hundred and fifty bucks for a fuck and a blow!" But I digress....

During my 20s I was mostly surrounded by other poverty-line people, who had all kinds of bizarre ideas of how things worked. One believed that a "bonus" was something you got on your tax return if you made enough money. Like a video game. A lot of "the Jews control everything" theories and frequent use of words like "sheeple". They didn't always have food on the table, but they always had beer in the fridge. An

I *do* know how these people think, which is probably why I have so much disdain for them. I know how stupid they are, how little they understand about anything, and the deep DEEP resentment they harbor for anyone who is well-off. They (most of them) truly think the following:

- they are poor because other people are rich

- the game is rigged and unwinnable

- any attempt to improve their lives (short of winning the lottery, which they play - a lot) is futile

I'm not happy to admit that we existed for almost a year in public housing. During that year, we were the only people to actually rent another place and move out. Everyone else who left left because they were kicked out, arrested, or something traumatic.

Windermere FL
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Repost. Because it was funny.

I googled "What would you do with a million dollars?" Look what some people think:

"I would take my mom to Spain, open a women's shelter, hike the Appalachian Trail, and the crazy thing I'd do after buying a bigger house is make a closet just for shoes. Then go out and spend days buying shoes."

"I would have my own media network and a scholarship program for moms that want to go to college after kids because that's what my mami did. As a couple, we have dreamed of having a small house with a huge garage so we can have one car for each day of the week or a really nice car collection."

"I would buy a vineyard in Italy and enjoy the fruits of my investment!"

"I'd buy a flat in France, Italy, Spain and Amsterdam. I'd hire a full-time stylist for my mom and sister. Buy my dad a humungous yacht named "Chulo" where we'd live 3 months of the year and park in Monaco."

"I'd buy a penthouse apartment on NYC's Central Park West (I've always wanted a view of the park!) Travel to Greece and Spain and spend a few months there. Return to NYC and use the money to set up a hospital or rehab center exclusively for bladder patients and their families. I'd reach out to the doctor that gave so much to my father, name it after him and give him all the resources I could to help others."

Windermere FL
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More mental noodlings....

We had a discussion once upon a time, much earlier in this thread, actually - where I was discussing IRiS nabbing you at the door if you tried to leave with more than $2 million in assets. We argued about whether or not $2 million was "a lot of money". Reading back through it is interesting. I think we were both right but we were talking about different things. What you were saying (although not in these words) is that reality doesn't drive most people. They don't and can't understand it. So those who understand reality have to work in a world where, at least on the surface, things are driven by perception.

What gives me such a headache is that I want a reality-driven world, not a perception-driven world. But we can't have my world. We have a perception-driven world, where what people believe - mathematics and evidence to the contrary be damned - is king. You said "The whole world is about perception, no matter how much you may not like it to be.", and that's correct.

So how do people succeed in it? I guess they just lie and go along with the perception like all of the idiots while, behind the scenes, working in reality. There isn't value arguing with someone the next time they bring up the whole "Warren Buffett's secretary" or "Mitt Romney's 14%" thing, because they don't and can't get it, and can't understand why the whole thing was a gross distortion of numbers designed to confuse them and make them vote a certain way.

Windermere FL
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I know. And politicians know it too. And they exploit that gap in understanding to rile people up.

Hence my grand disdain for most politicians. Every time I see one of these pricks - it could be the president, a Senator, an activist, whatever - exploiting these gaps in understanding it makes me mad. They might as well just say "I know you're all morons who don't understand what I'm talking about, but grab your pitchforks!"

FB: I don't own a pitchfork.

Windermere FL
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But your average person doesn't realize that.

Fullerton CA
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Of course we are not talking about 3% of their entire income.

Although for someone like the CEO of EvilCo, it would be close to that.

Windermere FL
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Well, we could get into the whole issue of marginal tax rates, so a 3% increase is not a 10% increase based on all of your income...

But let's just say that a lot of people don't understand math...

Fullerton CA
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Here's my JW:

How come the "Bush Tax Cuts" were considered a "huge giveaway" (or cut, or whatever), but reversing them is "just a little bit more"?

Those were Obama's words - asking "those at the top" to pay "just a little bit more".

If raising it was "just a little bit more", how come reversing it and cutting them back is a "huge tax cut"?

I know I know... we say a "3% increase" when we want it to sound small. Of course this is a rate increase, not the increase that's actually happening. An increase from 36 to 39.6% is a "3.6% increase", or, really, a 10% increase.

If we want to make it sound REALLY huge, we say something like "The CEO Of EvilCo. will get $20 million." But if we want to raise them, we say we're just asking him to pay "just a little bit more". But it's the same thing.

My other pet peeve - "not having it taken from you" = "getting".

Basically, the whole "figures lie and liars figure" statement. People use the words that evoke the sentiment they wish to foster. Pisses me off.

Windermere FL
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Everyone that can get out of California is out, its those busienses that cant or live off of goverment money. Tec make a large part of its profits off of free Iphones for the poor.

Las Vegas NV
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TOPIC: IRiS the Tax Dog, biting at the buttocks of those running away
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