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Disenfranchisement : Swingers Discussion 1002141011
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TOPIC: Disenfranchisement
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You haven't heard that? He, of course, is not going to say that in so many words, but that is the "conventional wisdom," whatever that is worth.

The theory goes that the Republican governor wants a revote, but wants the DNC to pay for it. The revote would cost $25 million. DNC doesn't have $25 million.

Caucuses would be cheaper, but since Hillary has lost all the caucuses, she is against that idea.

They will figure it out somehow...

Lakeside CA
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Hillary: Stand By Some Other Man By Ann Coulter Legal Affairs Correspondent, Human Events

The mainstream media said she was finished, but our brave Hillary soldiered on to wallop B. Hussein Obama in Ohio, Texas and Rhode Island Tuesday night. I don't know what the MSM is so upset about-- we let them pick the Republican nominee. Did they want to pick the Democratic nominee, too?

Not only that, but after some toothsome appearances on various madcap comedy shows this past week -- "Saturday Night Live," "Late Night With David Letterman," "Hardball With Chris Matthews" -- Hillary's "likability" quotient is soaring! According to the latest CNN/CBS News poll, she's just been upgraded from "Utterly Loathsome" to "Execrable." The percentage of registered voters who would rather disembowel themselves with a wooden spoon than vote for Hillary has just slipped below the magical 50 percent mark. We're surging, Hillary! If you want to be even more likable, you should go on "The View." Next to those four harpies, you seem almost agreeable.

Destin FL
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all they need is egore to take it to the supreme court. Hell the lib's even mess up their own crooked way of selecting a nominee.

Destin FL
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The Florida issue is that the governor wants to deplete the Democratic National Committee war chest. Another primary will cost $25 million and the Dems don't want to spend the money.

I think the talk of a split in the Democratic party is wishful thinking on the part of conservatives. Democracy is messy, no matter how you do it. That is the way it is supposed to be.

Once they get a candidate, the party will close ranks behind them. I expect the one not chosen to fully support the other.

IMHO, the delegates should not be seated.

And for those whining about the Dems changing the rules, I'm sure if we looked for a few minutes, we could find plenty of instances where the Repubs have done the same thing...

Lakeside CA
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On the fence? Dzzy...

Fact is the DNC knows if it goes to the superdelagets for a decission. And they know the party cannot handle the split they will go for a do over to save the party. Clinton speaks of a joint ticket with Obama as the dream ticket, I call it a compromise to a stalemate. And again the party will suffer. A power struggle, I have to laugh at the whole thing and watch with awe....More concerned for the power than whats in it for America. The choice is clear. McCaine has been shown to bring in both sides and has a record of unity between the parties to include Indep.. The right choice would be a person willing to do what is right and willing to enlist the other side for advice.

Imperial MO
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this is a quandry to be sure and I am not sure that there is a right answer. in reality they knew the consequences and made their decision and should bear them. however, insofar as florida has a republican governor and republican controlled legislature that made this decision it mitigates it a bit. so my vote would be to not seat michigan delegates and as to florida seat them and let them vote as the may..

Philadelphia PA
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Obama, Hillary in Civil War

Thursday, March 6, 2008 9:39 PM

By: Newsmax Analysis Article Font Size

With Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's decision to stay in the Democratic race to the bitter end, she has signaled a delegate fight all the way to the party's convention in Denver this August. Both candidates appear in something of a stalemate. Political strategists have concluded that Clinton cannot overcome Sen. Barack Obama's pledged delegate lead by winning additional primaries. And despite his lead in electoral and delegate wins, Obama cannot seal his nomination without the support of the party's superdelegates. Clinton's decision, after winning in Texas, Ohio and Rhode Island this week that she would not capitulate has opened up the first skirmishes in a looming Democratic civil war. Already the intraparty battle - described by the Boston Globe as "trench warfare" - has cost the Democrats a whopping $275 million. The war has no end in sight and is shaping up to be a take-no-prisoners battle.

Cash: Both sides are now swimming with the ammunition that politicians need to wage war. Obama announced this week that he raised a stunning $55 million in February. Clinton hasn't matched those numbers, but she is playing catch-up. Since Tuesday, she raked in a cool $3 million. 'Monster' Hillary: Obama foreign policy aide Samantha Power told Britain's Scotsman that Clinton is "a monster . . . she is stooping to anything" and described her circle as being on the "warpath." Ken Starr: Clinton's campaign lashed out at Obama Thursday, accusing him of becoming another "Ken Starr" because he promised to be more critical of his opponent. The Obama campaign has complained Clinton has dragged her feet in releasing her tax returns and her documents as first lady. Florida and Michigan. Both the Obama and Clinton camps are deadlocked on the matter of the Florida and Michigan delegates. Party Chairman Howard Dean says he wants a new vote in those states but he won't use party money to pay for it. That benefits Obama, because Clinton would have likely won those states in a re-vote. If Dean and the Obama can keep the current slate of Florida and Michigan delegates off the convention floor, Clinton's position is further undermined. Black Revolt: Influential African-Americans like Donna Brazile, Al Sharpton and former Virginia Gov. Douglas Wilder are warning that the Democratic Party may be fractured and crippled if it does not abide by the will of the pledged delegates in picking the nominee. Meanwhile, the fraternal struggle among Democrats may be netting Republicans support. Former Bush strategist Karl Rove notes Thursday in The Wall Street Journal "the interesting electoral phenomenon is the emergence of the 'McCainicrats' -- Democrats backing Mr. McCain." Rove continued: "In three recent polls, (Fox, LA Times/Bloomberg and Gallup), almost twice as many Democrats support Mr. McCain as Republicans support Mr. Obama. Three times as many Democrats support Mr. McCain as Republicans back Mrs. Clinton."

Imperial MO
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Ok let me see if I got this right. Florida and Michigan go against the DNC and decide to hold early primaries. The DNC tells them that they will not have their delegates seated if they do this. They do it anyway. The voters knew, or should have known that the delegates would not be seated. They voted anyway, perhaps believing that the DNC would fold and seat the delegates anyway. Now it appears that breaking the rules works, at least when it comes to the Democratic party. It amazes me, the DNC sets rules and then has to reverse itself. This could give Clinton the lead or even get her the nomination, because she played the odds and put herself on the ballet for Michigan. Florida would probably have gone to her anyway, but then again Obama was able to beat her in states that she was favored in before so who knows. So should these delegates be seated or should the stick to the position they set from the outset? I have a feeling what conservatives would say, but lets hear from some democrats on this.

Arlington TX
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TOPIC: Disenfranchisement