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are religious people less intelligent than atheists : Swingers Discussion 226549
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FORUMSGeneral DiscussionsOpen Forumare religious people less intelligent than atheists
TOPIC: are religious people less intelligent than atheists
Created by: Seduction4Two
Original Starting post for this thread:
That's the provocative conclusion of a new review of 63 studies of intelligence and religion that span the past century. The meta-analysis showed that in 53 of the studies, conducted between 1928 to 2012, there was an inverse relation between religiosity -- having religious beliefs, or performing religious rituals -- and intelligence.

That is, on average, non-believers scored higher than religious people on intelligence tests. What might explain the effect? Scientists behind studies included in the review most often suggested that "religious beliefs are irrational, not anchored in science, not testable and, therefore, unappealing to intelligent people who 'know better.'”But the researchers who conducted the new meta-analysis say the answer is a bit more complicated. They suspect intelligent people might have less of a "need" for religion."Intelligence may also lead to greater self-control ability, self-esteem, perceived control over life events, and supportive relationships, obviating some of the benefits that religion sometimes provides," study co-author Jordan Silberman, a graduate student of neuroeconomics at the University of Rochester, told The Huffington Post in an email.So if you're a believer, does this mean you're a dope?"I'm sure there are intelligent religious people and unintelligent atheists out there," Silberman said in the email. "The findings pertain to the average intelligence of religious and non-religious people, but they don't necessarily apply to any single person. Knowing that a person is religious would not lead me to bet any money on whether or not the person is intelligent."The researchers acknowledge the limitations of the meta-analysis. It did not look at type of religion, for example, or at the role culture might play in the interaction between religiosity and intelligence.In addition, The Independent pointed out that the researchers used a narrow definition of intelligence. In the paper, intelligence is defined as “the ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend complex ideas, learn quickly, and learn from experience." This excludes other forms of intelligence, like creative and emotional intelligence.The meta-analysis was published in Personality and Social Psychology Review.

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This analysis considers a person's religiosity. That's a term that's near impossible to define and assign to an individual.

Pittsburgh PA
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"And this is relevant to this particular thread why? "

It highlights some of the pitfalls of meta-analysis.

What are the religious views of those conducting this study? Anybody know?

Pittsburgh PA
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And, IMHO....

this business some people put forward of "just in case" faith is laughable to me. If God exists, He knows perfectly well what you're up to. Anyone who "just in case" believes in God does so as honestly as one who "just in case" believed in Santa Claus when they were maybe 9 years old. "I don't really believe in Santa Claus, but just in case he's real, I hope he doesn't know I don't believe in him so that he still brings me presents."

So many people in Mrs. VA's family wanted me to get baptized so that we could be married in her family's church. Perhaps I take baptism more seriously than they do - I'm not going to do it for the sake of making people happy.

Land O Lakes FL
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Here's my deal...

Besides the lack of any evidence of God, I find my ability to believe in an all-loving God to be at odds with what I see in the world.

The true horror that some truly innocent people are subjected to - without intervention by God - is beyond my ability to reconcile with an all-loving God. The fact that God - with all of his powers - would sit idly by while some people are subjected to such cruelty and pain is unfathomable to me.

If I meet God when I die, I want to know why he makes the decisions he makes. I'm a big boy - I can take it. Please God - tell me why you let a newborn baby be raped and abused by people. Tell me why you don't intervene when a child is starved and brutalized by adults. Tell me why don't answer the prayers of people who truly need you. Tell me why, in spite of all of my efforts, once upon a time, you never spoke to me.

God gave me no reason to believe He exists, and plenty of reasons to believe he doesn't. So if he really does, he's played a pretty big trick on some of us, and is either very cruel, or not nearly as powerful as we have been led to believe.

Land O Lakes FL
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I totally get it Gina.

I have no disrespect for religious people. Far from it.

I have my beliefs and they have theirs. Cool. I will happily respect them, even if they don't all respect me, for we all have our convictions, values, and belief systems, and they are not all going to work together. That is perfectly fine with me.

Land O Lakes FL
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oh darn...no magic flying Twinkies?

I do understand this argument, and can see its merit: there has to be thought and logic and a sort of scientific mind to develop atheism or agnosticism. While that may or may not make people more or less intelligent, it does usually indicate "thinkers."

A faith based life doesn't make a person less intelligent. Personally, my faith is very personal. How about that for a statement? I don't feel a need to justify it or argue it or try to persuade someone or judge someone who chooses not to believe as I do. To me, faith and hope are pretty synonymous. But that's just to me, for me. The fundamentalists tend to sound more stupid the more they try to coerce another person to believe as they do, get narrow-minded and defensive about the belief that they are right and everyone else is wrong, and can also blindly follow a human preacher's leading without question. THAT is when faith can sound like ignorance or stupidity. A minister used to phrase it this way: Some people are so "heavenly minded" that they are no earthly good. I always thought that made sense.

Former Southern Baptist, converted catholic, and a proponent of being spiritual rather than religious. I will never be one to judge another person's faith or religion, or lack thereof. And I will remain open and tolerant to all points of view on this subject. Gina

San Antonio TX
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Sed,

I disbelieve in God. I also disbelieve in magic flying Twinkies. But I am open to the possibility of anything, provided some evidence is brought along to support it.

The scientist in me demands evidence-based proof. And a book about God doesn't prove any more than a book about Harry Potter. I'm always willing to be proven wrong, and I'd be ecstatic to be presented with hard evidence that God existed.

God - if you can read this:

1. Please fix SLS.

2. Please send Scarlett Johanssen to next weekend's party, preferably only with eyes for me.

3. If both 1) and 2) happen, I'll concede that you exist.

Land O Lakes FL
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And this is relevant to this particular thread why?

Lakeside CA
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A recent study published in JAMA reviewed 29 meta-analyses from high impact journals and found that conflicts of interests in the studies underlying the meta-analyses were rarely disclosed. The 29 meta-analyses included 11 from general medicine journals; 15 from specialty medicine journals, and 3 from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The 29 meta-analyses reviewed an aggregate of 509 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Of these, 318 RCTs reported funding sources with 219 (69%) industry funded. One hundred ans thirty-two of the 509 RCTs reported author conflict of interest disclosures, with 91 studies (69%) disclosing industry financial ties with one or more authors.

However, very rarely was this information reflected in the meta-analyses. Only two (7%) reported RCT funding sources and none reported RCT author-industry ties. The authors conclude “without acknowledgment of COI due to industry funding or author industry financial ties from RCTs included in meta-analyses, readers’ understanding and appraisal of the evidence from the meta-analysis may be compromised.”

Pittsburgh PA
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This whole thread belongs in "WTF"

Pittsburgh PA
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TOPIC: are religious people less intelligent than atheists