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RACISM-A long way to go here on SLS : Swingers Discussion 2190371031
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FORUMSGeneral DiscussionsOpen ForumRACISM-A long way to go here on SLS
TOPIC: RACISM-A long way to go here on SLS
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Humans are Pack Animals, just like other creatures. Safety in numbers at it most common level, complete insanity at its worst when compassion is removed.

We and so many others embrace difference and compassion so, I think our pack is growing..

San Antonio TX
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"People adjust their hair and clothing styles to fit in, and tend to group with people who look and act similarly, and tend to exclude people who are not like ourselves. This is instinctual - I am absolutely convinced"

You hit that one out of the park! Excellent!

And people who don't adjust their image, language, and such are going to be excluded at some point.

Pittsburgh PA
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Actually, let me add another thought.

Look at how cliques form in places. They happen. In school. At work. Social situations. People group together. Especially when they are young, they often do so with some unifying theme, such as music, style of dress, scholastic ability etc. The jocks. The cheerleaders. The nerds. The "headbangers" as they were called when I was in high school. Punks. Preppies. Goth. Body types (fat kids), etc. You get the idea.

Did someone groom them all to be like this? I doubt it. People seek those they feel are like them, and to make themselves feel more secure, they look for reasons to believe why they are better than "others".

Think of it this way:

You see a black man and a white woman who are clearly a couple. Someone asks "How did THAT happen?" You deem this to be racist and offensive, or at least ignorant. Right?

You see an enormous fat man tattooed and pierced to the 9s and covered in freaky leather, with an extremely attractive, professionally groomed and dressed woman.

Tell me - honestly - you don't think to yourself "How did THAT happen?" Of course you do, and I'll have a hard time believing you if you say otherwise. So why is that statement less offensive than the first?

We look for things that make us "the same". People adjust their hair and clothing styles to fit in, and tend to group with people who look and act similarly, and tend to exclude people who are not like ourselves. This is instinctual - I am absolutely convinced. Race is one of those things. However, it's one which we have no control over.

Chesapeake VA
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"Someone with bad parenting got it started, and others followed. "

Probably. But I do not think necessarily.

Bigotry and hate exist and have existed in every culture in history. Surely it must arise spontaneously at least sometimes.

I'm going to respectfully agree to disagree with you on this.

Chesapeake VA
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"I did too. Why? I can only imagine peer pressure. My parents certainly didn't teach me that."

Surely you realize the kids didn't spontaneously generate this attitude among them. Someone with bad parenting got it started, and others followed.

A kid might feel inferior or superior, based on his upbringing. There's no survival value in feeling inferior, and just a temporary ego boost from feeling superior.

Flat Rock NC
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The city I grew up in was more or less a cultural monolith. In my primary school there was one Asian girl and one black girl. Everyone within a couple of grades in either direction was white.

The black girl in particular was picked on a lot, and I am ashamed to admit I did too. Why? I can only imagine peer pressure. My parents certainly didn't teach me that. So I was around 8 or 9 and a lot of us said mean things regarding her skin color. I didn't know the "N" word - I have no recollection of hearing that word prior to seeing Blazing Saddles when I was perhaps 12 and asking my parents what that meant. But people would call her idiotic things like "rotten chocolate". For no reason other than being asshole kids.

For whatever reason - maybe it was because she didn't really react - it seemed to stop after not very long, thankfully. I have always felt bad for going along with that. I remember her name. Unfortunately it's so common (her last name was Smith) that it would be extremely difficult to locate her today to see how she's doing.

Chesapeake VA
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We lived in an area in the Midwest where the neighborhood was nearly all white. It was by chance not design. Our children had no exposure to anyone of any color. Diversity was not in this neighborhood at this time for whatever reason. It was white....

We traveled to Kansas City and our boys were 3 years and 6 months. Our oldest needed to have 'play and run time'. So we went to the nearest park. The park will filled to the brim with African Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and a few other nationalities, but you guessed it, no whites except for us.

Our son's need to play was more important that finding a park that we were not the minority. He sat down in the sand box and began to play. A little African American boy came over and started playing with our son. At 3, they play a bit more along side of each other than with each other. But there was communication between them and well, it seemed all okay.

The mother came over and asked us if it was alright her son played with our son. I looked at her with a bit of shock. Yes is was all right I said. She looked around and asked what we were doing in THIS park. I told her our son needed to play and we were on vacation and this was the first park we found. She asked if we realized that we were the only whites in the park. I told her I hadn't really took count, but yes, it is obvious that we are white and the only ones. She asked if we were scared to be here. I told her no, should we be? She looked at me funny. I asked if she has a problem with my white son playing with her son? She said no, but it is the first white boy her son played with. I looked at both of the boys and said, "Doesn't seem like either of them know of their differences or care."

She actually took a big breath and said "thank God".

Both of our boys have had friends and girlfriends African American, mixed, Asian, Indian (India), Pakistani, Russian, Hungarian, Native American, African, Bosnian, Hispanic, British, Irish, Australian, Jewish, Republican, Democratic, and a bunch more that I cannot remember. They don't pick their friends based on their color, race, or ethnicity, but based on who they are as a person outside their race or religion. They learned this not because it was what was taught but because it is what is right. All people judged on the person they choose to be and not how they were born.

We have no control over our race or ethnicity but we have control over the person we are.

Sophia

Hendersonville NC
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I understand what you mean. But children aren't afraid of a lot of things that they should be. They are not fully developed.

I remember the day our son realized people were different colors. He was about 3. I was hauling the kids in a wagon around Niagara Falls, and my son yelled out "DARK!" I said "What?" And he pointed at a black man and he said "DARK! He's dark!"

I really wasn't prepared for this... but it got even more amusing... his head began whipping around... thinking to himself in his head "OMG! A LOT of people are different colors!" He really didn't know how to verbalize it, but it was amusing to see him come to this realization on his own. I imagine it would be similar to knowing nothing but life in black and white and then one day, everything's Technicolor.

Another time we were in a grocery store and saw an Asian family. My son (then about 6) blurted out:

"DADDY! LOOK! ME CHINESE!!! DING DONG DING DONG DING DONG!!!!"

I had never pushed a cart faster in my life... trying to get that little prick away to have a little chat with him about what had just happened.... I was mortified...

Chesapeake VA
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you want racism? go to africa where you can be killed just for being in the wrong tribe,look different,or just for being......have you heard obama speach at morehouse college.talk about being a raceist.a man will be judged by his deeds not by the color of his skin.obama must have missed that speach....BS

Kingston TN
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VB, there are no racist children -- unless and until they have learned that attitude from their parents or others.

A child may be fascinated that a person is another color, but there's no instinct that suggests he is inferior.

A black co-worker was having dinner with us, and my youngest daughter was fixated on him. An older sibling asked why she was staring. The little one asked, matter of factly, "Why are you so ... black?"

Someone said, "It's in his genes". And little kid was perplexed, and then looked under the table to see what might be in his jeans.

Flat Rock NC
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TOPIC: RACISM-A long way to go here on SLS