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Fixing a Broken Educational System : Swingers Discussion 423561021
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FORUMSGeneral DiscussionsOpen ForumFixing a Broken Educational System
TOPIC: Fixing a Broken Educational System
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My husband retired from the AF earlier than we would have wished because of our children. He was transferred a lot and as the children were coming to HS age we felt it was important to give them consistency in both their education and socialization. So he left right at 20. We made the decision well in advance so we could research and plan. Fortunately (at the time) one of his best job offers came from California. It had been one of our top choices due to the remarkable education system there. 17 years ago it was at the top five in the country year after year. Moving from a suburb of St Louis to Orange County, CA was major sticker shock but we still sought out an affluent community known for it's fine schools. We were glad we did but it turned the quality of the schools had nothing to do with the cost of the community. The tax structure in CA results in the school districts that have a lot of business and industry are the ones with all the money and the bedroom communities full of families like us are the poor districts. So what made this a fine school district. Excellence in the administration and very serious parent involvement and contribution and a whole lot of the two working together. More to come.................

Saint Augustine FL
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BITSA, it's just not fair to exonerate the responsibility of parents. I agree with you about the teacher's unions. Hell, I think teacher education is a farce. At virtually every university everyone knows that getting your degree in education is the easiest way to get a diploma. It's a radical thought, but maybe teachers should have a degree in the subect they teach!

Still, parents who don't value education and view schools as daycare centers and sports venues instead of educational institutions are a HUGE problem. If kids don't learn to value education at home, they sure aren't going to try very hard to learn in school.

There is plenty of wrong on BOTH sides.

South Riding VA
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This topic hits home for us. Our 14 year old son has been slipping through the cracks at school. It all started in before school because the cut off for enrollment was 7 day before his birthday. He aready knew he's ABC's and could count to 100. At kindergarten enrollment we ask the teacher if they would be able to keep him chanenged. They said yes. That lasted till our son learned how to get his way from the teachers so he did not have to do his work. Yes we should have addressed it then. By 2nd grade they had put him in the resource room for reading and spelling. His teachers call a meeting with us to tell us he had ADHD. We went to our family doctor to have him checked out. Our doctor has other kids with ADHD. He came in and said our son did not have ADHD. But to be sure about the ADD he referred us to a specialist. Our son had a slite case of it. So we got a prescription and tried it out. He is now in the 8th grade. He gives his teachers fits because he can pass any test with an A. But does not do his homework. He is not in the resource room. But the teachers want to put him there. The resource teacher says he does not need to be in there.

Evansville IN
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We pulled our daughter out of the public school system and sent her to one of only two private schools in Plattsburgh, NY, where we lived at the time. Both were Catholic, although we were not even religious. The difference in the education was enormous. So was the difference in the students.

Part of the difference undoubtedly is economic - private schools require tuition payments, and therefore most of those students come from more affluent families. Most of the time affluence is related to the education of the parents which allowed them to get those higher-paying jobs. So the parents of those kids obviously valued education.

South Riding VA
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My opinion on the public school system, whether American or Canadian is this, we homeschool our children!

-S

Sherwood Park Canada
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We have been affilated with the public school system for 25 years now.Suzy has taught in the public school system for 25 years both in ohio and now in Floirida. 13 in ohio and 12 in florida. Your correct when you say parents are the problem. Not for having to tough of a standard in a class .In both Ohio and Florida they go the distance from second chance schools to special needs.Special needs go from learning disabiliy to higher education. The lack of parents caring what their children do or elarn is what is alarming.We have never seen a school coem down on an educator for making a class to tough.We have aseen parents discussing this issue with the educator.After full knowledge of what is going on most of the time the parent sides with the schools. Its the parent you have called for the 30th time saying your child was not in school again today and they say with disbelief what? As for what the students are taught,its at a much higher levell then when we were in school.Algebra is being taught in the 6th grade, when we went to school it was taught in the 9th or 10th grades.Kids in elementery school are learning computor skills.The style of education has changed as our times have changed.The kids learn at a much faster and higher rate then we did. in ohio we had locals where the area you lived in decided on how the school functioned . You could have many locals in one county. Where we are now, its counties that decide what the schools will have.The problem with this concept.The area with money has great schools the areas with less money are failing.This must be addressed and fixed. Both Ohio and Florida the Sate sets up min. guide lines for the schools to follow and what has to be taught. Where we grew up the private schools were the schools in which any drug could be had, as mom and dad would give the kids 50 to 100 bucks to get them out of their hair.

Sarasota FL
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I'm the one who essentially got the ball rolling on this topic and you bet I'll be jumping in and out of it. Now I am not an academic. I do teach on occasion but it is a CE instructor in a highly technical field (ECP's, the three O's of Opthalmic Optics) or business/management classes to management/executives in the optical industry. Therefore, I will try to focus my comments to the area I possess the most expertise....parenting. So my first observation is this...parents are too busy blaming teachers, teachers are too busy blaming society and parents.

Saint Augustine FL
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I spent a "prison term" teaching in public secondary schools one year. That's all it took to drive me out of THAT!

Here's a problem with public schools. It starts with PARENTS, who are the same people as the VOTERS. If a teacher pushes students to really learn, then they complain to their parents. The parents in turn complain to the principal or superintendent. The principal and superintendent then go to the teacher and say "Now, now, we can't be pushing these students so hard or we'll NEVER get a school budget passed!"

And it's true.

I know I'm old when I start telling "When I was a kid" stories. But when I was a kid, there was a paddle hanging on the wall in each classroom, and several times a year it was actually used. And instead of beefing to the school principal or superintendent, MY parents told me if I ever got in trouble at school that I was going to be in even bigger trouble when I got home.

In those "olden days," parents backed the schools, not their kids.

I also was in 6th grade when the then Soviet Union launced Sputnik in 1957. Suddenly we were in a huge race with the Soviet Union for space supremacy, and a huge arms race. There was a national sense of urgency to develop an educational system that would produce mathematicians and scientists to keep the U.S. ahead in the race. Schools accelerated their math & science curricula. Just in time for me to go to high school a few years later.

We had homework. Lots of it. And a few kids flunked each year, too, and had to repeat that grade all over again. No such thing as social promotions. Fear of embarrassment and humiliation are pretty good motivators. And kids need to learn that self-esteem is EARNED through successful performance. It is not a birthright for just showing up.

We never had to walk 10 miles through waist deep snow, though. :-)

South Riding VA
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OK, here's a new thread to pursue this topic.

I think it's important to note that public school and private school are 2 different animals altogether.

Also, K-12 is a whole different ballgame from university teaching.

I guess we can handle it all right in one thread.

South Riding VA
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TOPIC: Fixing a Broken Educational System