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any electricians here : Swingers Discussion 163568101
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TOPIC: any electricians here
Created by: daringduo1020
Original Starting post for this thread:
I have an electrical question if anyone may know how to solve.

the ceiling fan in our bedroom keeps blowing bulbs constantly. I am using 40 watt bulbs of which it is rated for and have even tried 20 watt bulbs with the same results yet the same brand bulbs will last a year in other places around the house and within a week 2 of the bulbs will blow then the 3rd but the last bulb will work for weeks until I replace the blown bulbs then it starts all over again and it dont blow bulbs in any pattern it is totally random.

the fan is about 10 years old and I installed it. I know I wired it properly as I am an accomplished do it your selfer and have wired up many things. I even checked the wiring and it seems fine. never had a problem with other fans, outlets, switches and such I have installed.

also it is on a dimmer switch if that matters. come to think of it that fan is the only thing in the house on a dimmer switch. HMM

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OK, for those that didn't scroll back a bit... :)

This post is over 2 1/2 years old. The OP solved the original problem within 20 days by replacing the ceiling fan assembly. Since the OP hasn't been on SLS in 2 years, we'll probably never know if that really solved their problem, but I'm pretty sure it did.

In general, vibration is what shortens the life of ceiling fan bulbs. When purchasing bulbs for ceiling fans, make sure you get the ones designed for ceiling fan use. The filament structure is more rugged to tolerate the added vibration. Even if you don't see or hear the vibration, it's there. The filament structure of a bulb is very delicate, especially when it is hot.

Vibration. Pure and simple. The OP noted that when he removed the old fan there was evidence of motor/bearing failure. That increased the vibration, and that is what shortened the life of the bulbs.

~Rick

P.S. For those wanting to know a bit more about electrical things....

A few general electrical notes:

A "short" would not usually shorten the life of the bulb. BUT, the the spark and "pop" will scare the heck out of most people and be an obvious sign and indication of where the problem is. That, and most likely, the breaker/fuse will blow on the first occurrence of a short. 120VAC shorts are generally pretty obvious. An "open" (or loose or broken connection) can be less obvious, but that would prevent the light from lighting or possibly cause it to flicker, but not shorten it's life as stated in the OP.

A properly wired light bulb doesn't need a ground at all. It needs a "hot" wire and a "neutral" wire. If a light fixture has a ground wire, it is there merely for safety sake so that should the "hot" or even "neutral" wire touch the chassis, then the current will be safely directed to ground, and not to someone touching the chassis. Polarized outlets ("neutral" prong wider than "hot" prong) pretty much eliminated the need for "grounded" lamp & appliance assemblies. Permanent fixtures will use a ground wire for additional safety, but more so to protect against a shock hazard with contact to the receptacle than the appliance.

All incandescent light bulbs give off a vast amount of heat, in fact from a power perspective, way more heat than light. While it is correct that having different metals as part of the conductive path can add to the resistance of the electrical path over time (and even potentially get hot enough to start a fire at that point, which is why a special "No-Ox" compound should be used on such connections) , I have never heard of that heat travelling into the bulb to shorten it's life. It won't happen.

Feeding Hills MA
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maybe paranormal activity??? (jk)

Jamaica NY
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You answered your own question. The problem is the dimmer switch, which is not supposed to be wired to the whole fan, only to the lights. If you do not have separate switches for the fan motor and the lights, do not use a dimmer switch, it will ruin the motor and might even cause a fire. If there is just one switch to the fan, change it back to a regular switch before you burn down your house.

Fort Worth TX
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LOL, I can't believe I'm replying to this in this forum! I'm an Electrical Contractor! Solution is simple.. And your problem is common. Check out the light bulb section at your local Home Depot or Lowes. There are specially rated bulbs just for ceiling fans. They are built better to sustain the constant vibrations. Although, if there is a bedroom on the floor above that has a lot of jumping and banging in it, that could be a whole issue of it's own!

Pine Island NY
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haha, fundamental's sexy ass meant that shit lol

San Marcos TX
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Hey The third time was a charm lol

Augusta NJ
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There must be a bumper sticker there....lol

Atlanta GA
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There must be a bumper sticker there....lol

Atlanta GA
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There must be a bumper sticker there....lol

Atlanta GA
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LMAO, first time I was ever told I did a nice job "mounting" . LMAO

Niagara Falls NY
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TOPIC: any electricians here