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TOPIC: Stress_fracture_of_toe
Created by: Leeza
Original Starting post for this thread:
Just wondering how many of you have had this injury and how did you deal with it? I'm in major denial of the prospect of wearing a boot for 2+ months and so far I'm continuing my activities at almost the same level as before the diagnosis.

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Thank you!

Gibsonia PA
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hmmm, clogdancing, that would look pretty hilarious

Gibsonia PA
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Get the walking boot. Get a 2nd for your other, non-injured foot. Take up clog dancing.

Problem solved.

T

Danville PA
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Thanks Peg and Fundamental.

My BIL hasn't seen the xrays; the xray itself doesn't show a fracture, but the thickening of the joint along with pain in the metatarsal and the pain with dancing is what sealed the diagnosis with my podiatrist.

Thanks for the thoughts on buddytaping - someone else had just mentioned that to me last night. I think I will try it.

In the meantime, I'm wearing the boot during the day, but I'm still dancing 3-4 times a week. It hurts, but it's not a horrible pain all the time. I guess I'm considering if I really have to take 2 months off from dancing, when I would do it...maybe during a time period when I won't be home much anyway (traveling a lot for work). I don't know, we'll see. I've talked to some dancers that have just worked(danced) right through it.

Gibsonia PA
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These are common fractures. If it is truly a stress fracture of a toe, buddy-taping to an adjacent toe may be sufficient treatment. If it is a stress fracture of a metatarsal bone (in the forefoot leading to the base of the toe) then 6-8 weeks in a boot or rigid flat-bottomed shoe is often prescribed. The key thing is to prevent further injury and keep the healing bone aligned. Thus the distinction between a phalangeal fracture (toe fracture) and a metatarsal fracture is important.

Atlanta GA
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Mrs Leeza, I have had both a stress fracture and impact fracture of my big toe. I refused to use the boot either time. Fortunately it was winter, and I lived in my UGGS with an arch support. Both times the fracture healed well, but I had to change my exercise routine to rowing, stationary cycling and circuits which kept me off the foot. If it is a stress fracture, it is likely a result of your routine and footwear, so you are going to need to change it up until it heals. Maybe enlist the help of a trainer or PT to give you some suggestions. Work on some specific training for your golf swing or pilates to help with your core and frame for dancing. Think of it as cross-training instead of being sidelined.

Keep out of heels and baby your foot for the first few weeks. Also remember that just because the pain is gone does not mean that the injury healed.

Hey - isn't the BIL a doctor? Is anyone evaluating you to see how you got the fracture?

Ocean City NJ
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Just wondering how many of you have had this injury and how did you deal with it? I'm in major denial of the prospect of wearing a boot for 2+ months and so far I'm continuing my activities at almost the same level as before the diagnosis.

Gibsonia PA
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TOPIC: Stress fracture of toe
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