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1- Why is gastric bypass so popular? 2-Why do we see such a prevalence of type II diabetes? 3-Why does obesity continue to climb? 4-Why has metabolic syndrome been categorized as a disease? 5-Why are insulin resistance, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and hypothyroidism becoming accepted as inevitable mid-life afflication?

1. Gastric bypass. Well I don't know about this. When a person weighs so much where death is a close associate than I say yes, they need it. They do not have 3 years to slowly lose weight appropriately. Such as a person who weighs 500 pounds and is bed bound. However. We are a microwave, lazy ass society and we want an easy fix to everything....hence why we spend billions on pills that promise the fantasy of eat everything you want and lose weight...which is complete bullshit. You feed your body garbage on a routine basis and you are going to feel like garbage. However a woman who weighs 250 pounds which is about what I weighed when I started this trek in my opinion does NOT need gastric bypass...she needs to get motivated and take her body back. My main concern about g bypass is like carnie wilson, you aren't taught the basics of living and eating in a healthy way. You get the quick fix and end up in the end weighing almost as much as you did before this invasive surgery because you did not learn about clean eating and healthy living. I am not saying the obese are lazy or ignorant...but you can look at a person's shopping cart and see why they are obese. I think g bypass should be much more controlled than it is.

Diabetes...well bad choices and obesity usually is the main cause of this disease. My aunt lost weight and was completely taken off of all diabetic medications and controls it with her diet. Some are genetic though, my Mom is a diabetic who weighs about 135 pounds. But for the majority of diabetics their diabetes would in the least be much better controlled with a healthy lifestyle.

Why does obesity rise? We're lazy and eating crap tastes good.


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Same here trooper. The little one cant wait to go outside and ride her bike on the side pasture.Best thing, if she falls no scrapes..

Augusta NJ
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we are blessed to live on 28 acres. My kids get to play outside all the time. Not much biking as our drive is gravel, although they do like big wheels. They love playing on the swing fort and just exploring on the property. One of the nice things about not living in the city!

Louisville KY
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We live in a rural part of NJ. There are alot of children riding bikes and horses here. Where I work you dont see many kids on bikes . The roads are narrow and no sidewalks. More kids are in the house and are gamers. Some neighborhoods it is just safer to stay inside sad to say. With the economy most poorer families are just trying to get bye and tend to buy food products that are filling yet not nutricious. Food today has more preservatives, hormones, pesticides and artificial fillers than years ago. My husbands illness has made our family more aware of such products. We eat organic pesticide free hormone free food. Grass fed beef, free range chicken and we take probiotics. Organic food can be very pricey depending on where you live. On the east coast we are lucky. Stop and Shop grocery stores have their own line of organics and do not charge more money for it.

Augusta NJ
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We are willing to rub cream on Torq in the hopes that it will produce a good result. We selflessly volunteer our cream application services....

However, I must say that her tummy looks fine to us, so really the cream is just an excuse to rub her. :)

White Plains MD
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Damnit! You mean there's no cream I can rub on it? ;) "

Haha I'm with you on that sister!


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Dear enigma16,

You bring up an important point and a common misconception.

Genome-wide association studies are now linking many genetic loci with predisposition to various diseases or conditions, including diabetes, hight blood pressure and, yes, some behavioral things such as alcoholism.

Unfortunately, these genetic associations are being confused with Mendellian inheritance where the presence/absence of a genetic variant confers an absolute probability that one will or will not exhibit the variant (such as sickle cell disease, classical hemophilia, Huntington's disease and so on). What comes out of the geneome-wide association studies are typically very weak influences on predisposition to diseases. This weakness is often overlooked by consumers, and this is why states such as California and New York are cracking down on direct-to-consumer genetic testing.

Simply because there is a mild genetic predisposition to (for example) alcoholism is insufficient to label alcoholism as a disease. All it means is that if one has the genetic variant, one is slightly more likely to become an alcoholic than one who does not have genetic variant. Having the variant does not predict that you will become an alcoholic, nor does the absence of the variant protect you from alcoholism.

Your larger point is nevertheless well taken. Behaviors can have their roots in disease states. We are in agreement, however, that the above fact does not in and of itself justify 'medicalization' of undesirable behaviors.

Atlanta GA
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Mariana...

In response to Q5...

"Why are insulin resistance, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and hypothyroidism becoming accepted as inevitable mid-life affliction? "

They are not being accepted as inevitable. What you are seeing is the 'medicalization' of human behaviors and their consequences. This happens with some frequency in our society--alcoholism, drug addiction, obesity, fibromyalgia are familiar examples--because the labels tend to legitimize the behaviors and justify treatments. ("It's not his fault--he's ill!) If you want a smile, recall the song "Sergeant Krupke" (or maybe Officer Krupke) from the classic musical, "West Side Story". The lyrics neatly lay out how such medicalization was occurring at mid-century and remind us that the medicalization is nothing new.

You are absolutely 100% correct to be outraged at the acceptance of these conditions as societal norms. The real issue is that exercise takes work, nutritious foods are often undelicious, and feeling a bit hungry is no longer considered acceptable. A couple of days ago, I did an informal survey of bright, talented and interested people. (None were obese, by the way.) The median minutes of exercise accumulated over four consecutive days by the 18 respondents was 90, which as you know constitutes the rock-bottom recommendation of 30 min/day, most days. Smart people, every one with at least one doctorate level degree, and half of these people did not achieve recommended levels of physical activity.

What MUST change are our expected behavioral norms.

Atlanta GA
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Mariana...

4. Metabolic syndrome has not been classified as a disease. It is a syndrome consisting of a cluster of disorders. The fact that it has an International Classification of Disease (ICD-9) code does not make it a disease in an of itself. The common code was intended as a shorthand way of identifying patients and to prevent doctors from unbundling multiple diagnoses. A joint statement issued by the American and European Diabetes Associations in 2005 suggested that the definitions were too loose and that critical reappraisals were necessary. As a practicing physician and surgeon, it's fair to say that the component disorders often do cluster together in single patients, and that the lifestyle changes necessary to treat any of those disorders improves the situation in the rest of them. More follows...

Atlanta GA
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Because people want things NOW with no work. Its a shame.

Mrs. Voya

Detroit MI
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TOPIC: Need answers