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Even a Little Overweight, Inactivity Hurts the Heart : Swingers Discussion 120767
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FORUMSGeneral DiscussionsFitnessEven a Little Overweight, Inactivity Hurts the Heart
TOPIC: Even a Little Overweight, Inactivity Hurts the Heart
Created by: Seduction4Two The original post for this thread was deleted.
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That's a vicious cycle, PD. You're not alone in those cravings...

Any helpful suggestions to combat that? It's worse at hormonal times of course.

San Antonio TX
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G, I'll bother you! You are doing great baby girl, just be patient with yourself.


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I have a weird thing, if I eat something sweet, then I feel like I need something salty. I have been trying to cut down my salt consumption.

Quakertown PA
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Maybe if that's what you want your life to be. For me, I'd rather learn healthier LIFE patterns and habits and change some of the bad thinking I've had that has perpetuated my "overweight-ness." That's harder to do b/c it's not set in stone, and it has to come from within me. "harder to do" might not be the correct term, but it's longer lasting at any rate.

Learning to leave something on my plate. To take out a handful of cereal from my bowl and put it back in the box, to incorporate regular and MORE activity, to think about what I'm putting in my mouth and WHY...those and other tactics are going to be more helpful to me than following a set diet sheet and failing. And I will fail at those. They are set up to fail.

Whereas, what I do with my life, with getting more info and actively taking part in my own health, listening to good advice from people who've been there, who've had success, from doctors, etc., and doing what I can SLOWLY, in small increments that I will stick with (!) are what works for me.

Can I have a piece of chocolate? Sure. But I am learning not to grab a bag of M&Ms and mindlessly scarf them into my mouth, but instead, going and chosing one expensive piece and enjoying that from time to time. That's just a small example, and no, I haven't "gotten it all down" yet. I have 48 years of bad habits to undo. It won't take me another 48 years to undo them, but it might take several months to relearn some ingrained behaviors.

I just want to feel better. I don't mind someone "nagging" me a bit, as long as my character isn't attacked. I actually like it that people ask, "So, what activities did you do today?" or "How's it going with your eating?"

Gina

San Antonio TX
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fl and mariana y'all are experts. Weight Watchers. I know next to nothing, possibly less, about it...but the girls in my office are all on it. And they are cheating already! They have this book that tells you what you can eat where........is it really okay to think you can lose weight or get healthy off of eating bean burritos and tacos from Taco Bell every day? They have the points down and have changed NO habits. They are still within their points allowance but...can you really lose weight eating that way? They have Taco Bell pegged already because you can eat bean burritos from there.


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HotVirgo raises an important point. Setting an example can be difficult enough ("Oh, you're just vain." "What are you, some kind of a health nut?" "Didn't you like the food? You've left some on your plate.") However, comments to others are seen as nagging at best.

Some years ago in my clinical role, I was seeing a woman who worked for the post office as a letter carrier. She would walk six miles each day with a sack of mail. She was in pretty good shape as a consequence of this daily aerobic activity. She fell off a ladder changing a lightbulb at home, broke her leg in a couple of places and ended up on disability leave. Unsurprisingly, she lost muscle mass and not changing her eating habits, put on some weight. About three months later, she and her husband came in to the office demanding more disability time. I demurred and said that the best thing for her would be to ramp up her activity and get back to work, as her job contained the type of exercise that promoted fitness and so on. He (not she) became furious with me, telling me that I had no business telling them (him) how to conduct their lives. He stormed out, she followed, and they never appeared again. Perhaps they found a more 'sympathetic' physician. I tell this story to point out that advice about living (in the office, I refer to these comments as lifestyle recommendations, but the word is overloaded in this forum) even from health professionals is not always heard gracefully much less acted upon. It IS seen as nagging, or worse.

Somehow, we have to get across the idea that health is both a shared goal as well as a shared responsibility. It makes it easier to reject the doughnut that Shell mentioned, and easier to facilitate helping parents stay fit as Mariana observed.

Atlanta GA
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I will say that the story about the woman who lost 50 pounds and was self-managing her diabetes meds was inspiring and motivating. Much more so than just telling me how many calories are in something I've already eaten, etc. I know what I'm doing wrong, but to be able to hear of someone with success, then for me, that's motivating. Thanks.

San Antonio TX
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It is very true that a person has to want to himself/herself. No one can really motivate or help anyone unless that person wants it for herself first and foremost. Just continue to be a good example by what you do more than what you say. Once that person (I'll use myself as an example) wants to make changes, then be there for any advice or help asked.

For now, my 22 yr old son, my husband and I are all on the same track to lose 20 pounds, and that's just a reasonable number we came up with, not unreachable or daunting. When we all reach that, we can set other goals. But our main one is to make small lifestyle changes that we can adopt/adapt to our lives.

My son is doing a spreadsheet for himself, which is a good idea. We're all encouraging each other, but we all also know that we will need help from time to time from people who are "already there" and maintaining. I'm sure I'll be asking for that from you all in here.

Gina

San Antonio TX
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Heehee usually I get eye rolls lol. I have actually lost good friends though through my evolution of weight loss, namely my best friend. I was always the fat, funny one and she was the skinny, pretty one. Well. When I was also the skinny, pretty one she had issues with that. To this day she will only speak to me in polite terms, she simply did not like what she interpreted as competition. So yes, this is something that unfortunately you have to deal with.


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That is the exact truth. Losing weight is along the same vein with giving up any addiction...until you look in the mirror and realize that you have to take control you never will. You can have 20 counselors chasing you around (Oprah) and chefs, personal trainers, etc. and if you don't want to you simply will not.


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TOPIC: Even a Little Overweight, Inactivity Hurts the Heart